SOUTHEY A SUBSCRIBER

Original Poems …

Carlisle, Printed by F. Jollie; and sold by W. Clarke, J. Robson, and R. Faulder, London. 1800.

12mo., pp. xxiii, [1], 238, including a 15-page list of subscribers; clean tear to title-page and two other leaves (no loss), a good copy in contemporary half-calf, corners and joints rubbed, covers somewhat scuffed; inoffensive ownership stamp to title-page.

£350

Approximately:
US $450€396

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Original Poems …

Checkout now

This collection, ‘written in a sequestered village’, includes ‘Shakespeare, the Warwickshire Thief’, ‘Elegy to the memory of Robert Burns the Scottish poet’, ‘Sonnet to the Right Hon. Edmund Burke’, and ‘Ode to the Genius of Cumberland’. Thomas Sanderson (1759-1829) was a schoolmaster and friend of the Cumbrian poets Robert Anderson, and Josiah Relph. He wrote a memoir of Relph, as well as an elegy which appears here, and compiled A Companion to the Lakes.

The list of subscribers includes Southey and Bewick.

Jackson Annals p. 244. Johnson Provincial Poetry No 795.

You may also be interested in...

THE NEWARK PIRATE’S SURREPTITIOUS REPRINT BYRON, George Gordon, Lord.

Poems original and translated … Second Edition.

Unacknowledged reprint of the ‘second’ [i.e. first] edition of Poems original and translated, printed by Ridge without Byron’s permission. As the first printing ran out Ridge told Byron that he had reprinted some sheets to make up a few more copies; in fact he was to continue to reprint the whole volume surreptitiously on paper watermarked 1811. John Murray later noticed either this imposture or the spurious ‘large paper’ copies of Hours of Idleness, and informed Byron who replied, ‘I have no means of ascertaining whether the Newark Pirate has been doing what you say – if so – he is a rascal & a shabby rascal too – and if his offence is punishable by law or pugilism he shall be fined or buffeted’ (5 February 1814).

Read more

ROBINSONADE [DUCRAY-DUMINIL, François Guillaume].

Ambrose and Eleanor; or, the Adventures of two Children deserted on an uninhabited Island. Translated from the French. With Alterations, adapting it to the Perusal of Youth, for whose Amusement and Instruction it is designed. By [Lucy Peacock] the Author of the Adventures of the six Princesses of Babylon, Juvenile Magazine, Visit for a Week, &c. Second Edition.

Second English edition (first 1796), a translation of Lolotte et Fanfan (1788). Lucy Peacock kept a shop on Oxford Street which stocked her own and other juvenile tales. Lolotte et Fanfan (1788) evidently appealed for its didactic potential, but required significant editing: ‘many characters and scenes woven into the original, could neither afford pleasure nor advantage to a juvenile reader’.

Read more