SOUTHEY A SUBSCRIBER

Original Poems …

Carlisle, Printed by F. Jollie; and sold by W. Clarke, J. Robson, and R. Faulder, London. 1800.

12mo., pp. xxiii, [1], 238, including a 15-page list of subscribers; clean tear to title-page and two other leaves (no loss), a good copy in contemporary half-calf, corners and joints rubbed, covers somewhat scuffed; inoffensive ownership stamp to title-page.

£350

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US $463€408

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Original Poems …

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This collection, ‘written in a sequestered village’, includes ‘Shakespeare, the Warwickshire Thief’, ‘Elegy to the memory of Robert Burns the Scottish poet’, ‘Sonnet to the Right Hon. Edmund Burke’, and ‘Ode to the Genius of Cumberland’. Thomas Sanderson (1759-1829) was a schoolmaster and friend of the Cumbrian poets Robert Anderson, and Josiah Relph. He wrote a memoir of Relph, as well as an elegy which appears here, and compiled A Companion to the Lakes.

The list of subscribers includes Southey and Bewick.

Jackson Annals p. 244. Johnson Provincial Poetry No 795.

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