Kigelia Pinnata,

circa 1880s, printed 1890s.

Albumen print, 10⅞ x 8⅜ inches (27.5 x 21.2 cm.); signed Scowen & Co, Ceylon and titled Kigelia Pinnata in the negative, with the blindstamp Apothecaries Co Ltd.

£500

Approximately:
US $607€548

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Charles Scowen arrived in Ceylon around 1873 and was initially an assistant to R. Edley, the Commission Agent in Kandy before opening a photographic studio around 1876. By 1885 his photography firm had studios in Colombo and Kandy. Scowen was a later arrival to Ceylon than Skeen and his work is less well-known, but: ‘Much of Scowen’s surviving work displays an artistic sensibility and technical mastery which is often superior to their longer-established competitor. In particular, the botanical studies are outstanding…’ (Falconer, J. and Raheem, I., Regeneration: a reappraisal of photography in Ceylon 1850 –1900, p. 19). In the early 1890s the firm was being run by Mortimer Scowen, a relative of Charles Scowen. By about 1894 the firm’s stock of negatives had been acquired by the ‘Colombo Apothecaries Co Ltd’.


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