A brief Memoir of the life of the Honourable Colonel Algernon Sidney; with a short account of his trial, in the Court of the King’s Bench, November 7, 1683: to which is added , a description of Mr. F. P. Stephanoff’s painting of that celebrated event …

London, Bohn, 1835.

8vo, pp. iv, 5-74; lithographic folding frontispiece; title-page and last leaf browned, else a good copy in recent brown cloth, spine gilt.

£75

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A brief Memoir of the life of the Honourable Colonel Algernon Sidney; with a short account of his trial, in the Court of the King’s Bench, November 7, 1683: to which is added , a description of Mr. F. P. Stephanoff’s painting of that celebrated event …

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First edition of this memoir reclaiming Sidney as a modern hero of independent thought and ‘disinterested’ republicanism. The reproduction, apparently by lithography, of the Stephanoff painting, made widely available through John Charles Bromley’s engraving, is accompanied by a description of the principal characters. The author Richard Chase does not appear to have been a direct relation of Algernon Sidney.

LibraryHub notes only four copies, at Birmingham, Cambridge, St Andrews and the V&A.

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