IN BASKERVILLE TYPE

The chase, a poem: to which is added Hobbinol, or the rural games ...

Birmingham, Robert Martin for A. Donaldson, 1767.

Large 8vo, pp. 199, [1 blank]; very light damp stamping/cockling to lower margins (most noticeably to quire L), light browning to last few leaves; a very good copy in 19th-century crushed green morocco by Riviere, gilt spine, turn-ins and edges, marbled endpapers; extremities very slightly rubbed.

£250

Approximately:
US $313€275

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The chase, a poem: to which is added Hobbinol, or the rural games ...

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A handsome edition, printed by Robert Martin using Baskerville type. The Chase is Somervile’s best known poem, first published in 1735 and dedicated to Frederick, prince of Wales. ‘In four books of blank verse he conveyed the excitement and dangers of the chase as well as its place in history’ (ODNB). Hobbinol, or, The Rural Games, a burlesque dedicated to Hogarth, first appeared in 1740.

ESTC T67410; Gaskell, Baskerville, Add. 3.

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