History of the British Legion, and war in Spain, from personal observations and other authentic sources, containing a correct detail of the events of the expedition under General Evans, – its moral, political, and military character, – its successes and reverses in the engagements fought, and hardships suffered, with numerous anecdotes of individuals, etc., etc., etc. With an appendix, containing every officer’s name, rank, and service, that was in the expedition, and a portrait of Lt. Gen. Sir George De Lacy Evans, M.P. G.C.St.F. and K.C.B.

London, James Pattie, 1839.

8vo, pp. xvi, 1–48, 65–645, [1, blank], [647]–720 (complete), with a lithographed portrait-frontispiece of Sir George de Lacy Evans (spotted and slightly offset onto title); several full-page wood-engraved illustrations in the text; a few gatherings lightly toned; modern calf-backed marbled boards; from the library of Ian Robertson (1928–2020).

£750

Approximately:
US $919€871

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History of the British Legion, and war in Spain, from personal observations and other authentic sources, containing a correct detail of the events of the expedition under General Evans, – its moral, political, and military character, – its successes and reverses in the engagements fought, and hardships suffered, with numerous anecdotes of individuals, etc., etc., etc. With an appendix, containing every officer’s name, rank, and service, that was in the expedition, and a portrait of Lt. Gen. Sir George De Lacy Evans, M.P. G.C.St.F. and K.C.B.

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Second edition of one of the finest and most entertaining accounts of the First Carlist War; a considerably reworked, expanded, and eccentrically illustrated version of Somerville’s A narrative of the British Auxiliary Legion, published in Glasgow the previous year.

Alexander Somerville (1811–1885), of Oldhamstocks, East Lothian, ‘grew up in poverty. His father lacked the 1s. required to register his birth, and his mother sewed rags together to clothe him’ (Oxford DNB). Poverty led him to enlist in the Scots Greys in 1832. He soon defied authority when the regiment was stationed in Birmingham to police the Reform agitation, and on another matter that year he was court-martialled and publically flogged, his case becoming something of a cause célèbre. After service in the British Legion in Spain, he returned to England in 1837 to begin a literary career devoted to social and political questions.

‘In a few instances, the reader will find the subject interfered with, by wood engravings, of which the author has only to say, that he is greviously [sic] ashamed . . . . The author is at a loss to account for the appearance of such abortions’ (preface, p. vi).

Alberich 1106 (erroneous collation); Palau 319138.

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