ANSWER TO PAINE

An Answer to Thomas Paine’s third part of The Age of Reason, published by D. I. Eaton; likewise to S. Lane, a Calvinistic preacher, at Yeovil, in Somersetshire; and to Hewson Clarke, editor of The Scourge, and late of Emanuel College, Cambridge.

London, Marchant and Galabin, 1812.

8vo, pp. 66; a few leaves foxed, the odd light spot, but a very good copy in recent brown cloth, spine gilt.

£350

Approximately:
US $440€390

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An Answer to Thomas Paine’s third part of The Age of Reason, published by D. I. Eaton; likewise to S. Lane, a Calvinistic preacher, at Yeovil, in Somersetshire; and to Hewson Clarke, editor of The Scourge, and late of Emanuel College, Cambridge.

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First edition, scarce pamphlet dictated to Southcott’s secretaries, Ann Underwood and Jane Townley, consisting of her refutations of Thomas Paine’s attack on religion, the Age of Reason (first published 1794), as well as her spirited defence against contemporary abusers: a preacher called Lane, who had accused Southcott of sedition, and a Cambridge student called Hewson Clarke. Southcott reiterates here her argument that God would choose a woman to be his prophet, because his first prophesy was heard by Eve at the Fall.

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