VENERIAL TOASTS

consisting of the best and most approved Songs, of the Chace; ancient and modern (some entirely new) calculated to give sporting a Zest, and enhance the Delights of Conviviality … To which is added, the Sportsman’s Toast Assistant, or President’s Sentimental Guide. (Entirely new).

London; Printed for J. Roach … and sold by all the Booksellers in Great-Britain and Ireland. [1791-2?]

12mo., pp. 92, with an engraved frontispiece by Barlow after Isaac Cruikshank (tispy huntsmen raising a toast to ‘The Royal English Hunter that caught the Prussian Doe’, dated 20 December 1791); a very good copy, without the two terminal advertisement leaves called for in ESTC, but bound with the latter portion (pp. 37-60) of Jack Sprit Sail’s Frolic (John Roach, 1791?), including two advertisement leaves; full calf, gilt, by Wood; the Dulles–Duke of Gloucester–Schwerdt copy, with bookplates.

£1250

Approximately:
US $1545€1387

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
consisting of the best and most approved Songs, of the Chace; ancient and modern (some entirely new) calculated to give sporting a Zest, and enhance the Delights of Conviviality … To which is added, the Sportsman’s Toast Assistant, or President’s Sentimental Guide. (Entirely new).

Checkout now

First edition of a scarce compilation of hunting songs and toasts to venery (in both its senses).

Most of the content is anonymous, though a number of songs are attributed to Dibdin, and others, with rather less accuracy, to Charles II, Waller, and Dryden. The ‘Sportsman’s Toast Assistant’ (pp. 87-92), designed for the sort of drunken evening Cruikshank depicts in the frontispiece, make heavy use of the potential for lewd double-meaning offered by hunting vocabulary, with toasts raised to ‘The brave sportsman that erects his crest when he sees his game’; ‘The stable that is always open to the bald-faced colt’; ‘May every foxhunter carry two stone more than his weight and his mare find the benefit of it’.

Roach (fl. 1789-96) ‘sold from his Drury Lane, London, shop prompt-book plays, odd volumes, children’s anthologies, and jest and song books’ (Oxford DNB). He often commissioned illustrations from his friend Isaac Cruikshank (or Crookshanks), father of the caricaturist George Cruikshank.

ESTC: BL, Bodley (3, one imperfect); Louisiana State, Library of Congress (wanting ads); and Alexander Turnbull Library.

You may also be interested in...

[COLERIDGE, Samuel Taylor, and Robert SOUTHEY.]

The Devil’s walk; a poem. By Professor Porson. Edited with a biographical memoir and notes, by H. W. Montagu ...

First separate edition, first issue with pages 21 and 22 omitted in the pagination. In its earliest form the poem appeared (anonymously) in the Morning Post for 6 September 1799 as ‘The Devil’s Thoughts’. Shelley published a response and continuation in 1812, The Devil's Walk: a Ballad, after the food riots in Devon. In 1827 Southey amplified the original poem considerably, expanding it from thirteen stanzas to fifty-seven, but also transforming a radical poem into a conservative one. The title was also changed to echo that of Shelley's ballad. The attribution to Porson created considerable controversy, which in turn gave rise to a number of parodies and imitations.

Read more

PLINY UPDATED, WITH CHARMING ENGRAVINGS PLINY, the Elder.

C. Plini secundi des wijdt-vermaerden natur-kondigers vijf boecken. Handelende van de nature. I. Vande menschen. II. Vande viervoetige en kruypende dieren. III. Vande vogelen. IV. Vande kleyne beestjes of ongedierten. V. Vande visschen, oesters, kreesten ...

One of several Dutch editions of selections from Pliny’s Natural History to appear in the half-century following the publication of the first Dutch translation in 1610. The present edition, like many of the others, is enlarged to include much information not available to Pliny (the additions are printed in italics). Comprising extracts from Books 7–11 of the Natural History (on human beings, quadrupeds, birds, small animals and fishes respectively), it is especially notable for the many charming engravings of exotic birds and animals, some of them newly-discovered, in particular the orangutan (‘Indianschen satyr’), the armadillo, the ant-eater, the dodo, and the tree dragon.
 
COPAC records the British Library copy only. Worldcat records no copies in the US.

Read more