Yorick’s Meditations upon various interesting and important Subjects. Viz. Upon Nothing. Upon Something. Upon the Thing. Upon the Constitution. On Tobacco. On Noses. Upon Quacks. Upon Midwives. Upon the Homunculus. Upon Hobby-Horses. Upon Momus’s Glass. Upon Digressions. On Obscurity in Writing. On Nonsense. Upon the Association of Ideas. Upon Cuckolds. Upon the Man in the Moon. Upon the Monades of Leibnitz. Upon Virtú. Upon Conscience. Upon a Close-Stool. Meditations upon Meditations …

London: Printed for R. Stevens … 1760.

Small 8vo. in fours, pp. [2], 110; a little soiling but a good copy in old sheep, rubbed, rebacked, free endpapers renewed.


US $1686€1369

Make an enquiry

First edition. The first two volumes of Tristram Shandy had no more than come off the press when ‘all Grub Street broke loose at [Sterne’s] heels’ (Cross, p. 227). Among the deluge of pamphlets ‘something better’ is to be found in Yorick’s Meditations and a second work by the same author, A Supplement to the Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, ‘“the best ape,” said the London Magazine, “of the original Shandy we have yet seen”’ (ibid., pp. 228-9).

The anonymous author – could it be John Hall Stevenson? – has clearly been an attentive and sympathetic reader of Shandy, and if ‘Yorick has something to say upon every subject’ (p. 107), these are often subjects that echo themes found in the novel.

ESTC finds five copies in the UK, and six in the USA: Harvard, Yale, NYPL, Indiana, UCLA and Colonial Williamsburg.

You may also be interested in...

[JOHNSON, Samuel].

The Prince of Abissinia. A Tale. In two Volumes …

First edition of Johnson’s only novel, written in the evenings of a single week to pay for his mother’s funeral. Its rapid execution is said to have been due to the fact that he had been pondering its chief topics all his life. It soon became his most popular work. Although now inevitably called ‘Rasselas’ after the name of the hero, that title was not used in the author’s lifetime except for the first American edition (1768).

Read more


The Western Mail: being a Selection of Letters made from the Bag taken from the Western Mail, when it was robbed by George –––––, in 17––. Now first published.

First edition. Like her better-known older sister Anne, Annabella Plumptre (‘Bell’) was a translator and novelist. Their father was Robert Plumptre, prebendary of Norwich and president of Queen’s College, Cambridge. They began their writing careers as part of the Enfield circle where participation in private theatricals may have contributed to Bell’s easy assumption of different characters and idiolects in this collection of stories.

Read more