SIGNED BY STRAVINSKY

Berceuses du chat. Suite de chants pour une voix de femme et trois clarinettes. Mis en Français par C.-F. Ramuz. Partition d’Ensemble.

Geneva, Edition Ad. Henn, 1917.

Oblong 8vo, title leaf, contents leaf + 8 pp. printed music, text in Russian and French; plate number A69H; folded as issued in publisher’s original printed wrappers, some tears at fold.

£1200

Approximately:
US $1670€1386

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Berceuses du chat. Suite de chants pour une voix de femme et trois clarinettes. Mis en Français par C.-F. Ramuz. Partition d’Ensemble.

Checkout now

First edition of Stravinsky’s settings of four traditional Russian folk songs: ‘Spi kot’ (‘Sur le poêle’), ‘Kot na pechi’ (‘Intérieur’), ‘Bai-bai’ (‘Dodo’), and ‘U kota kota…’ (‘Ce qu’il a, le chat…’). The settings, for alto voice and three clarinets, were composed in 1915-16 when Stravinsky was in exile in Switzerland. They are similar in style to his ‘Pribaoutki’ (‘Nonsense rhymes’) of 1914, and are dedicated to Natalia Goncharova and Michel Larionov. The front cover is signed and dated ‘Igor Strawinsky, Dec. 1917’.

You may also be interested in...

POETRY AT THE RUSSELL-SARTRE TRIBUNALSIGNED BY SARTRE AND DE BEAUVOIR [SARTRE, Jean Paul].

Til Vietnam.

First edition, numbered 27 of 100 copies. The anthology was published by the Copenhagen office of the International Tribunal on War Crimes, in connection with the second session held in Roskilde in 1967. The tribunal was organised by Bertrand Russell and hosted by Sartre. De Beauvoir was a member of the tribunal along with other eminent human rights activists, politicians and scholars, including three Nobel Prize winners.

Read more

A PRESENTATION COPYFROM HERSCHEL TO LACROIX HERSCHEL, John F.W.

On the Development of exponential Functions, together with several new Theorems relating to finite Differences … from the philosophical Transactions.

Presentation copy of one of Herschel’s earliest papers, an offprint from the Philosophical Transactions inscribed by the author to Silvestre Lacroix. Though the majority of his scientific celebrity was founded on his later work in astronomy, John Herschel’s (1792–1871) early promotion of continental analysis proved a significant contribution to British mathematics. With fellow undergraduates at Cambridge, principally Charles Babbage and George Peacock, Herschel established in 1811 the Analytical Society, which proved instrumental in ending the isolation of the Cambridge curriculum from continental mathematics and promoting the work of European mathematicians. First among these was Silvestre Lacroix (1765–1843), to whom this copy is inscribed, and whose Traité du calcul différentiel et du calcul integral was translated by Herschel in the same year.

Read more