WITH CARTHUSIAN MANUSCRIPT APPENDIX

Exercitia D. Ioannis Thauleri piissima, super vita et passione salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi, in gratiam ac sitientium salutem, ex idiomate Germanico in Latinum nuper versa. His, eiusdem fere argumenti alia prorsus divina accesseru[n]t, auctore D.

Nicolao Eschio … Antwerp, Philippus Nutius, 1565.

12mo, ff. 169, [2], [1 (blank)], followed by 13 pp. of manuscript in a sixteenth-century hand; woodcut device to title, large woodcut initials throughout; a little foxing to title, small marginal wormhole to first two leaves, margins occasionally cut close (touching marginal notes); overall very good in contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments and lettered directly in gilt; some worming at head and tail of spine with loss of endcaps, some wear to corners; remains of red wax seal to upper pastedown, inscription ‘Troufflaut 1819’ to title and a note by him to the front free endpaper verso.

£1250

Approximately:
US $1517€1478

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Exercitia D. Ioannis Thauleri piissima, super vita et passione salvatoris nostri Iesu Christi, in gratiam ac sitientium salutem, ex idiomate Germanico in Latinum nuper versa. His, eiusdem fere argumenti alia prorsus divina accesseru[n]t, auctore D.

Checkout now

Scarce edition (first 1548) of this devotional work on the life and passion of Christ, this copy with a near contemporary manuscript appendix by a Carthusian and with interesting provenance.

Spuriously attributed to the German Dominican Johannes Tauler (c. 1300–1361), one of the greatest mystics and preachers of the Middle Ages, the Exercitia super vita et passione Jesu Christi are here presented in the Latin translation of Laurentius Surius (1523–1578), the German Carthusian hagiographer. Arranged in fifty-five chapters, the text comprises reflections on various episodes from Christ’s life (in particular the Passion), interspersed with prayers and confessions. The final quarter of the volume is devoted to further spiritual exercises by the Dutch theologian Nicolas van Essche (1507–1578) covering knowledge of God and oneself, penitence, mortification, sins and virtues, love for others, and union with God.

The thirteen pages of elegantly written manuscript notes in Latin and French which follow the printed text relate to indulgences granted to members of the Carthusian order. They explain the requirements for obtaining indulgences – reciting the Seven Penitential Psalms if literate, repeating the Lord’s Prayer and Hail Mary twenty-five times if illiterate, or listening to them if too sick to speak – and provide a calendar listing the feast days on which these devotions are to be performed, and quantifying the indulgences in terms of years relief from penance, e.g. 158,000 years if performed on Epiphany (6 January).

Provenance: with the ownership inscriptions of Gilbert Trouflaut (1736–1820), canon and organist at Nevers cathedral, friend of Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and a noted botanist and naturalist who established the botanical garden at Nevers. His note to the front endpaper reads ‘Ce livre inspire la plus tendre et la plus touchante piété sur la vie de Jesus Christ notre divin rédempteur’.

Adams T272. OCLC records three copies in the US (California State, Marquette, and Stanford); Library Hub shows two in the UK (London Library and Westminster College Cambridge).

You may also be interested in...

PRESENTATION COPY – ANNOTATED BECQUE, Henry.

Les Corbeaux, pièce en quatre actes.

First and second editions of Becque’s innovative realist drama, inscribed by the author on the first half-title to ‘mon cher [Jules-Charles] Truffier’, with authorial marks and annotations on thirty-three pages in the second edition showing changes made for performance.

Read more

ON CHARITY CORTÈS, Gioacchino. 

Dissertazione anti-Bolgeniana sopra la carità difesa dal suo autore l’abate Gioacchino Cortes contro il ch. Signor abate Gianvincenzo Bolgeni. 

First edition of this response to and attempted refutation of Bolgeni’s Della carità o amor di Dio by the Spanish Jesuit Joachim Cortès.  Della carità was the best-known work of the Jesuit theologian and controversialist Gianvincenzo Bolgeni, in which he had argued, against the Dominican de Rubeis, that the theological virtue of charity was rooted in the love of God due to God’s goodness to us, rather than due to intrinsic and absolute goodness.  This approach unsurprisingly resulted in a series of responses, often from Bolgeni’s former Jesuit confrères, among them Cortès, who published his Anti-Bolgeniana de Amore Dei dissertatio in 1790.  Here, Cortès responds to Bolgeni’s reply, addressing Bolgeni’s work in detail, quoting chapter and verse, and responding to each of Bolgeni’s attacks on Cortès, in which the Italian had attempted to argue that Cortès was a defender of Jansenist doctrines. 

Read more