The Trials of Arthur Thistlewood, and others, for high treason, at the Old Bailey Sessions-House, commencing on Saturday, the 15th, and ending on Thursday, the 27th April, 1820. Taken in short hand, according to the method invented by John Byrom … Illustrated by back and front views of the premises in Cato Street … and by several original portraits of the principal conspirators … with an appendix, containing circumstantial details of the execution and decapitation of Thistlewood, Tidd, Ings, Davidson, and Brunt.

London, Sherwood, Neely, & Jones … and J. Asperne, Cornhill, 1820.

8vo, pp. iv, 200; stipple-engraved frontispiece portrait of Thistlewood, tissue-guard, six further stipple-engraved portraits and two etched plates, one showing four of the conspirators escaping across the rooftops; offsetting from plates, browning and spotting throughout, small restoration to upper margin of last leaf; tear up gutter and across G2 affecting text, repaired with tape; a good copy in late nineteenth-century half maroon morocco and marbled boards, green morocco lettering-piece to spine; occasional marks in blue ink.

£450

Approximately:
US $600€532

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The Trials of Arthur Thistlewood, and others, for high treason, at the Old Bailey Sessions-House, commencing on Saturday, the 15th, and ending on Thursday, the 27th April, 1820. Taken in short hand, according to the method invented by John Byrom … Illustrated by back and front views of the premises in Cato Street … and by several original portraits of the principal conspirators … with an appendix, containing circumstantial details of the execution and decapitation of Thistlewood, Tidd, Ings, Davidson, and Brunt.

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First edition, a fairly deluxe account by the usual standards, of the Cato Street Conspiracy trials. In 1820 five conspirators, probably from a much larger group of Spenceans centred on the radical Marylebone Union Reading Society, including one black man, Thomas Davidson, were hanged and beheaded for high treason after plotting to murder cabinet ministers.

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