SWIFTIANA

A Collection of Welsh Travels and Memoirs of Wales. Containing I. The Briton Describ’d, or a Journey thro’ Wales: Being a pleasant Relation of D__n S___t’s Journey to that ancient Kingdom … II. A Trip to North Wales, by a Barrister of the Temple. III. A Funeral Sermon, preach’d by the Parson of Langwillin. IV. Muscipila; or the Welsh Mouse-Trap, a Poem. The Whole collected by J. T. a mighty Lover of Welsh Travels.

London: Printed for and sold by J. Torbuck … 1738.

8vo., pp. xv, [1], 64; 30; 15, [1], with a page of advertisements at the end but apparently lacking a further advertisement leaf; engraved frontispiece of ‘The D__n setting out on his journey’ (remargined), several marginal tears to latter leaves, some repaired and affecting headlines but a very good copy in recent quarter calf, morocco lettering piece.

£1100

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A Collection of Welsh Travels and Memoirs of Wales. Containing I. The Briton Describ’d, or a Journey thro’ Wales: Being a pleasant Relation of D__n S___t’s Journey to that ancient Kingdom … II. A Trip to North Wales, by a Barrister of the Temple. III. A Funeral Sermon, preach’d by the Parson of Langwillin. IV. Muscipila; or the Welsh Mouse-Trap, a Poem. The Whole collected by J. T. a mighty Lover of Welsh Travels.

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First edition of this compilation of whimsical works about Wales, reissued and published as though under the auspices of Swift.

The principal tract, ‘A Journey through Wales’, which satirises the habits, history, architecture, and social mores of the Welsh, is a new edition of a work by William Richards, Wallography; Or The Britton Describ’d: Being a Pleasant Relation of a Journey into Wales, &c. (1682). That Torbuck tried to pass off the work as Swift’s is a compliment to the quality of Richards’s satire.

The engraved frontispiece, which depicts Swift departing on horseback from the gates of his deanery, had first been used in a satirical Whig pamphlet of 1714. ‘The Mouse-Trap, a Poem’ is translated from Edward Holdsworth’s original Latin by Samuel Cobb. The brief ‘Funeral Sermon’ is delivered in imitation of a regional accent.

Teerink-Scouten 982.

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