Authentick Coppie of the Tryal of Scot and Mackpherson Anno 1712. Laid before the House, pursuant to their Lordships’ Order for that Purpose, 18 Aprilis, 1737.

London: Printed by John Baskett, Printer to the King’s Most Excellent Majesty. 1737.

Folio, pp. 33, [1 blank]; fold to lower corner, else a very good copy, disbound from tract volume, remains of leather spine.

£45

Approximately:
US $56€50

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Authentick Coppie of the Tryal of Scot and Mackpherson Anno 1712. Laid before the House, pursuant to their Lordships’ Order for that Purpose, 18 Aprilis, 1737.

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First edition of this London trial of Scottish cattle-rustlers. Donald McPherson, a merchant drover, was driving black cattle from the North of Scotland into England, when he was attacked near the river Tweed by William Laidly, or ‘Scot’, his brother Walter and their gang. McPherson was dragged backwards from his horse by his hair and severely beaten with horse-whips, and his servant’s finger was nearly severed with a shearing hook. The Laidlys proceeded to drive the cattle over rough terrain, laming a number of them.

The prosecutor was James Erskine, Lord Grange. The trial stated that several of the witnesses were unable to speak English, so one of the jurors is asked to translate. His fellow jurors include a watchmaker, a musician and William Paterson, a bookbinder.

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