Das morphonologische System der russischen Sprache.

Prague, Jednota československých matematiků a fysiků, 1934.

Large 8vo, pp. 94, [2] blank; a very good copy, uncut and unopened in the original printed wrappers.

£350

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First edition, published as the second part of Description phonologique du russe moderne; the first part, Roman Jakobson’s ‘Phonologie général du mot’, was published later.

‘The Prague school was a group of Czech and other scholars … doctrinally centred round Prince Nikolai Trubetzkoy [1890–1938], a professor in Vienna 1923–38, Vilem Mathesius, and Roman Jakobson, which held regular meetings and published Travaux du cercle linguistique de Prague. Their main interest lay in phonological theory, and the most important work associated with the school was Trubetzkoy’s Grundzüge der Phonologie (principles of phonology), on which he was working up to his death’ (Robins, p. 229).

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