A PROCLAMATION FOR STARVATION

A wonderful Sermon, or, truth undisguised. To be preached on the fast-day … With suitable hymns, a proclamation, and petition to His Majesty. [Price six pence].

London, D. I. Eaton, 1796.

8vo, pp. 16; the last few leaves foxed, occasional dusty marks and one or two corners folded, but a very good copy, uncut in recent brown cloth, spine gilt, bound in with numerous blanks.

£375

Approximately:
US $523€434

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A wonderful Sermon, or, truth undisguised. To be preached on the fast-day … With suitable hymns, a proclamation, and petition to His Majesty. [Price six pence].

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Second issue, possibly preceded by an undated issue priced three pence, of this pseudonymous, rabidly republican pamphlet in the form of a ‘proclamation’ by the King of Hog Island for a ‘general starvation’. This is followed by a sermon calling for war with France, accompanied by suitably apocalyptic biblical verses. Printed by the radical printer Daniel Isaac Eaton, under his radical imprint, ‘Printer to the Supreme Majesty of the People’.

Goldsmiths’ 16892.

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