FROM THE LIBRARY OF A HORSE GUARD

The Farrier’s and Horseman’s complete Dictionary, containing the Art of Farriery in all its Branches, with whatever relates to the Manage, and to the Knowledge, Breeding, Feeding, and Dieting of Horses, as delivered by the best Writers upon these Subjects.

London, J. Beecroft, J. & F. Rivington, W. Owen, T. Lowndes, and G. Robinson, and Southampton, T. Baker, 1775.

8vo, pp. vi, [330]; A3, A-U8, X4,Y1; marginal tear to A4; an excellent copy in contemporary English speckled sheep, spine gilt-ruled in compartments with gilt red morocco lettering-piece in one, others with gilt centre-piece, board-edges roll-tooled in gilt; a few small scuffs; near-contemporary ink ownership inscription to title ‘Captn Tharp, Roy[a]l H[or]se G[uar]ds – Blue'.

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The Farrier’s and Horseman’s complete Dictionary, containing the Art of Farriery in all its Branches, with whatever relates to the Manage, and to the Knowledge, Breeding, Feeding, and Dieting of Horses, as delivered by the best Writers upon these Subjects.

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Third edition, from the library of Captain John Tharp of the Royal Regiment of Horse Guards. Born in Jamaica, John Tharp (1769-1851) served in the Blues, as a cornet from 1792 and a captain from 1799. Evidently interested equestrianism, surviving correspondence from his father complains of his ‘extravagance’ in ‘riding high priced horses’.

ESTC T111931; Dingley 652.

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