The revolutions of Spain, from 1808 to the end of 1836. With biographical sketches of the most distinguished personages, and a narrative of the war in the Peninsula down to the present time, from the most authentic sources.

London, Richard Bentley, 1837.

Two vols., pp. xv, 411, [1]; viii, 535; with a frontispiece-portrait in each volume; some occasional light spotting and soiling, old ownership inscription at head of titles; original purple cloth-backed boards, printed paper spine labels; rubbed and slightly stained, spines faded, paper labels very worn; from the library of Ian Robertson (1928–2020).

£250

Approximately:
US $0€0

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The revolutions of Spain, from 1808 to the end of 1836. With biographical sketches of the most distinguished personages, and a narrative of the war in the Peninsula down to the present time, from the most authentic sources.

Checkout now

First edition of this pro-Carlist dissection of recent Spanish history. ‘The narrative commences with the year 1808; not only because the Spanish reformers who have entailed so many calamities on their country first came into notice at that period, but because the real character of the prince whose persecutions and vicissitudes I have undertaken to record [i.e. Don Carlos], then began to show itself’ (preface, p. vii).

William Walton (1783/4–1857) ‘was the son of William Walton, the consul for Spain in Liverpool. At an early age he was sent to Spain and Portugal to learn the languages and to fit himself for a commercial career before going to South America. He acted as a junior secretary to the British expedition which captured the town of Santo Domingo from the French in 1802, and remained there as British agent. In 1809 he returned to England, living in Bristol before moving to London, where he devoted himself to political journalism, writing pamphlets against current ministerial policies towards Spain and Portugal, including open letters to the marquess of Lansdowne, Viscount Palmerston, and Earl Grey’ (Oxford DNB).

Provenance: the prominent Irish barrister, Liberal politician and sometime Lord Mayor of Dublin William Lane Joynt (1824–1895; see Dictionary of Irish Biography), with bookplate.

Alberich 962; Palau 373868.

You may also be interested in...

DRINKWATER, John [later John DRINKWATER BETHUNE].

A history of the late siege of Gibraltar. With a description and account of that garrison, from the earliest periods . . . . Fourth edition.

First published in 1785. The present edition prints the text of the corrected second edition (1786). ‘In 1777, aged fifteen, Drinkwater [1762–1844] joined as ensign a regiment of volunteers raised in Manchester, at a time of indignant excitement produced by the news of General Burgoyne’s surrender at Saratoga. The Manchester regiment or, more properly, the 72nd regiment or Royal Manchester volunteers, was not, however, sent to America, but to Gibraltar. The garrison was besieged in June 1779 by a Franco-Spanish force. Throughout the siege, which lasted until February 1783, Drinkwater kept a careful record of events. Thereafter the 72nd, in which he had become a captain, was ordered home and disbanded. From his memoranda Drinkwater compiled A history of the late siege of Gibraltar . . . dedicated by permission to the king. It went through four editions in four years’ (Oxford DNB).

Read more

Bombing the British Museum BRITISH MUSEUM.

List of Missing English Theological and Devotional Books.

Mimeographed typescript of books missing after the losses suffered by the British Museum Library during the Second World War. This is one of several lists of books destroyed, produced both as a record and as a tool for acquiring replacement copies – this copy appears to have been used for that purpose, with pencil dashes in the margins next to several books.

Read more