The Life of John Wilkes, Esq; in the manner of Plutarch. Being a specimen of a larger work. The second edition, revised and corrected.

London, J. Wilkie, 1773.

8vo, pp. [4], 36, with a half-title and an engraved frontispiece with caricature portraits of Wilkes, Wat Tyler, Alderman Beckford and Jack Cade; a good copy in nineteenth-century quarter green morocco; armorial bookplate of Thomas Davidson of Newcastle, inscription dated 1802 in his hand recording its receipt from a friend.

£250

Approximately:
US $348€293

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The Life of John Wilkes, Esq; in the manner of Plutarch. Being a specimen of a larger work. The second edition, revised and corrected.

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Second edition of a satirical ‘biography’ of Wilkes, published in the same year as the first; Cradock, whose windows had been broken by a Wilkite mob earlier in the year, ironically praises Wilkes’s many remarkable achievements.

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