The controversial Letters of John Wilkes … John Horne, and their principal adherents, with a supplement, containing material anonymous pieces, &c. &c. &c.

London, Sherlock for Williams, 1771.

8vo, pp. [2], 320; first and last leaves slightly dusty, some scattered foxing, else a very good copy in twentieth-century library half morocco over straight-grain cloth, rubbed; spine with raised bands, gilt; two engraved portraits mounted to front free endpapers, ink borders; inkstamps and bookplate of Norwich Public Libraries; presentation inscription dated 1900 signed by member of the Tooke family; notes in ink to title-page, one or two further annotations to text.

£150

Approximately:
US $167€170

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The controversial Letters of John Wilkes … John Horne, and their principal adherents, with a supplement, containing material anonymous pieces, &c. &c. &c.

Checkout now

First and only edition thus. Letters charting the friendship and quarrels of John Wilkes (1725–1797) and John Horne Tooke (1736–1812). Tooke was a member of the Society of Supporters of the Bill of Rights, which existed to pay of Wilkes’s debts in the name of the radical cause, but he later fell out with Wilkes over the use of these funds.

You may also be interested in...

FROM THE ALTAR TO THE GALLOWS [CALVO, Michele.] 

Vita, costumi, e morte di Michele Calvo, appellato de Castro, estratta dall’originale processo formato nella Regia Curia di Pavia. 

First and only edition of this scarce account of the life and death of Michele Calvo, a student of theology who turned to a life of crime, executed for practicing as a priest using falsified documents as well as theft and multiple escapes from prison. 

Read more

against antisemitism LEWIS, Wyndham.

The Jews, are they human?

First edition, Lewis’s first avowedly antifascist text, an argument against antisemitism written after the first draft of The Hitler Cult but published nine months earlier. Lewis had visited Germany, and the Warsaw Ghetto, in 1938, and had been left disturbed. ‘Perhaps because he had come to realise just how wrong he had been in his original belief that Hitler himself was not anti-Semitic, Lewis felt himself impelled to speak up on behalf of the Jews as they were becoming increasingly known to the British … too much had been written about the Jews on the grounds of common humanity, and far too little on the grounds of common sense. His appeal is, therefore, to the intelligence rather than to humanitarian feeling, though “it is extremely unintelligent, it is as well to remember, not to be humane”’ (Bridson, The Filibuster).

Read more