Athaliah; or the tocsin sounded by modern alarmists: two collection sermons, towards defraying the expense of the defendants in the late trials for high treason: preached on the nineteenth of April, 1795, in St Paul’s Church, Norwich.

Norwich, J. March, 1795.

8vo, pp. [vi], 106; aside from some marking to the last page, and very occasional light spotting, clean and fresh throughout; in slightly later calf-backed boards, title in gilt on spine; a good copy, with deaccession stamps from the International Institute of Social History on verso of title-page.

£300

Approximately:
US $389€332

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Athaliah; or the tocsin sounded by modern alarmists: two collection sermons, towards defraying the expense of the defendants in the late trials for high treason: preached on the nineteenth of April, 1795, in St Paul’s Church, Norwich.

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Only edition of these two sermons preached by the Norwich Methodist-turned-Baptist Mark Wilks (1748-1819) to raise money for the three radical publishers and writers newly acquitted of high treason. The climate as it now is, Wilks says, is one where even to use a French phrase is to invite suspicion, ‘but the word that has inspired the most dread in the British senate, and the adoption of which appears most criminal, is that of Citizen – Citizen!! How terrific! how inauspicious!’. But the men accused of treason, rather than being deserving of punishment, deserve the ‘praise, thanks, and admiration of a whole nation’.

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