Lessons to a young prince, by an old statesman, on the present disposition in Europe to a general revolution. The fifth edition, with the addition of a lesson on the mode of studying and profiting by reflections on the French revolution, by the right honourable Edmund Burke.

Dublin, William Jones, 1791.

12mo, pp. [viii], 175, [1] blank; with five engraved plates; wanting frontispiece portrait of Prince George, sometimes present; title-page somewhat dustsoiled, similarly corners of first few leaves, but otherwise, aside from some odd spotting, clean and fresh; with manuscript note on front free endpaper (dated 1915) and on verso of final leaf (dated 1820), and faint contemporary ownership signatures on p. iii, and p.1, dated 1795; in later cloth, skiver label on spine; somewhat sunned and worn.

£275

Approximately:
US $306€312

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Lessons to a young prince, by an old statesman, on the present disposition in Europe to a general revolution. The fifth edition, with the addition of a lesson on the mode of studying and profiting by reflections on the French revolution, by the right honourable Edmund Burke.

Checkout now

First Dublin edition of this popular introduction to practical political philosophy by the Welsh polemicist, educationalist, and philosopher David Williams (1738–1816).

Lessons, first published in London in 1790, functions both as an attack on Burke (made more explicit from the third edition on by the addition of the final lesson) and as a guide to different types of constitution: Williams in particular illustrates, using helpful diagrams, the constitutional structures of Britain, the United States, and France, writing with a degree of sympathy for the revolution in France, whose citizenship he took the following year.

You may also be interested in...

A TYPOGRAPHICAL MASTERCLASS IN MINIATURE [MINIATURE LIBRARY.] 

Bibliothèque en Miniature. 

A miniature library for children, printed in Henri Didot’s celebrated ‘Non Plus Ultra’ type, comprising Berquin’s Variétés, Démoustier’s Mythologie, Florian’s Mélanges, La Fontaine’s Fables, and poetry by Millevoye and Voltaire. 

Read more

against antisemitism LEWIS, Wyndham.

The Jews, are they human?

First edition, Lewis’s first avowedly antifascist text, an argument against antisemitism written after the first draft of The Hitler Cult but published nine months earlier. Lewis had visited Germany, and the Warsaw Ghetto, in 1938, and had been left disturbed. ‘Perhaps because he had come to realise just how wrong he had been in his original belief that Hitler himself was not anti-Semitic, Lewis felt himself impelled to speak up on behalf of the Jews as they were becoming increasingly known to the British … too much had been written about the Jews on the grounds of common humanity, and far too little on the grounds of common sense. His appeal is, therefore, to the intelligence rather than to humanitarian feeling, though “it is extremely unintelligent, it is as well to remember, not to be humane”’ (Bridson, The Filibuster).

Read more