The Principles and Practise of Sketching Landscape Scenery from Nature, systematically arranged and illustrated by numerous examples, from simple and easy subjects, to the more complicated and difficult combinations of objects. In four parts.

London, printed for the author, 1813 [-1815].

4 parts bound in one vol., oblong folio; pp. iv, 18, and 16 plates of soft-ground etchings; pp. 16, and 16 plates; pp. 8, and 16 plates; pp. 14, [2], and 16 plates; together 64 soft-ground etchings, one with 6 overslips demonstrating variations of light and shade; a very good copy in contemporary limp calf, covers with ornamental blind-stamped border, a little worn at extremities, upper cover with gold-tooled title panel, rebacked and with new endpapers.

£2250

Approximately:
US $2960€2607

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Principles and Practise of Sketching Landscape Scenery from Nature, systematically arranged and illustrated by numerous examples, from simple and easy subjects, to the more complicated and difficult combinations of objects. In four parts.

Checkout now

First edition of J. G. Wood’s last and most ambitious drawing book. Wood was a landscape painter speciallising in watercolour and exhibited at the Royal Academy between 1793 and 1811. Here his drawing lessons deal with sketching cottage scenery, trees and woods, village streets, and general views incorporating grandiose landscape settings and glimpses of houses and villages. Some plates have faint perspective lines drawn on to enable the student to understand the correct perspective.

The work was originally issued in four parts with wrappers. This copy was bound up at the time with the owner writing at the opening of each part a title which no doubt appeared on the printed wrappers. A fourth edition was issued in 1833, all are uncommon.

Abbey, Life, 194 (third edition (1820)).

You may also be interested in...

WITHER, George.

Juvenilia. A Collection of those Poemes which were heretofore imprinted, and written by George Wither.

Second collected edition, very scarce, much expanded from the first edition of 1622, adding Wither’s Motto and Faire Virtue or the Maid of Philarete.

Read more

CHANDLER’S TRAVELS IN GREECE: ‘THE ACCOUNT OF ATHENS IS VERY IMPORTANT; IT WAS THE MOST DETAILED CHANDLER, Richard.

Travels in Greece: or an Account of a Tour made at the Expense of the Society of Dilettanti.

First edition. The classical scholar, traveller, and author Chandler (bap. 1737, d. 1810) was educated at Winchester College and Queen’s College, Oxford, and awarded a demyship at Magdalen College in 1757. Following the publication of an annotated collection of fragments by Tyrtaeus, Simonides, Theognis, Alcaeus, Sappho, and other Greek poets in 1759, Chandler published a catalogue of the Arundel marbles in 1763 as Marmora Oxoniensis. ‘In 1764 Chandler was introduced to the Society of Dilettanti by Robert Wood, editor of The Ruins of Palmyra, and was commissioned by the society to undertake a tour of exploration in Asia Minor and Greece in the first independent mission funded by the society. As treasurer he was given command of the expedition, and was accompanied by Nicholas Revett [...] and by the watercolour painter William Edmund Pars. They were instructed to make Smyrna their headquarters and thence “to make excursions to the several remains of antiquity in that neighbourhood”; to make exact plans and measurements; to make “accurate drawings of the bas-reliefs and ornaments”; and to copy all inscriptions, all the while keeping “minute diaries”. Having embarked from Gravesend on 9 June 1764 the party spent about a year in Asia Minor [...]. On 20 August 1765 they left Smyrna for Athens, where Chandler gloomily noted that the Parthenon was in danger of being completely destroyed. He bought two fragments of the Parthenon frieze that had been built into houses in the town and was presented with a trunk that had fallen from one of the metopes and lay neglected in a garden. Although the party visited other parts of the Greek mainland their plans to visit Ithaca, Cephallonia, and Corfu were abandoned, principally because of the group's poor health’ (ODNB).

Read more