ANTI-SLAVERY CAMPAIGNER

Serious considerations on various subjects of importance. By John Woolman, of Mount Holly, in the Jerseys, North America, deceased; with some of his dying expressions.

London, Mary Hinde, 1773.

12mo, pp. [vi], 137, [1, publisher’s advertisement], each part with its own title-page included in pagination; a very good copy in contemporary plain calf; small chip to head of spine and two small holes at foot, corners slightly bumped, a few marks; printed slip, completed in manuscript, giving rules of the library of the Society of Friends at Wigton to front pastedown.

£200

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Serious considerations on various subjects of importance. By John Woolman, of Mount Holly, in the Jerseys, North America, deceased; with some of his dying expressions.

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First edition (quire B beginning on p. 7) of this collection of works by John Woolman (1720-1772), the Quaker minister and anti-slavery campaigner, comprising his ‘Considerations on the true harmony of mankind, and how it is to be maintained’, ‘An epistle to the quarterly and monthly meetings of Friends’, ‘Remarks on sundry subjects’, and ‘Some expressions ... in his last illness’. A Dublin reprint was issued in the same year. Woolman’s crusade against slavery began when he was asked, and refused, to write a bill of sale for a black slave, and his campaign took him thousands of miles through America and England, where he died at York. His impassioned speech at Philadelphia in 1758 prompted Quakers to begin freeing their slaves – the first large body to do so in America. Woolman also championed the cause of Native Americans.

This copy contains a printed slip laying out the six rules of the library of the Society of Friends at Wigton in Cumbria, which was also open to Quaker members in Bolton and Kirkbride.

ESTC T13151; Sabin 105207.

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