An outline of international price theories… with an introduction by Professor Lionel Robbins.

London, George Routledge& Sons, Ltd., [1939].

8vo, pp. xiii, [1] blank, 373, [1] blank; some foxing, else a very good copy in the original publisher’s blue cloth, spine direct-lettered gilt; complete with the dust-jacket, small ownership inscription and number stamp to the rear free endpaper.


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First edition, number seven in a series of monographs by writers connected to the London School of Economics and Political Science. This work was adapted from the essay which Wu submitted for his PhD, which was awarded by the University of London in 1937. In An outline of international price theories, Wu, a Chinese born Austrian economist who studied at the London School of Economics, provides a general survey of the historical development of international price relationships. Wu does not attempt to provide a comprehensive study of all the literature concerning his subject, instead he selects and analyses a representative group of theories from which he extrapolates his more general conclusions.

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