Miscellany Poems: As Satyrs, Epistles, Love-Verses, Songs, Sonnets, &c ...

London, Printed for C. Brome ... J. Taylor ... and B. Tooke ... 1704.

Folio, pp. xlvi, [2], 64, 63-438, with a fine impression of the mezzotint portrait by Smith after Lely; some slight foxing but a fine copy in full red straight-grain morocco by Lloyd, gilt, bookplate of C. L. F. Robinson.

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First edition of a substantial collection of previously unpublished poems, edited from Wycherley’s manuscripts in a last-ditch attempt to relieve him from debt. ‘It was badly misjudged. Poems on a womans’s “Fair Back-Side” and on another’s “Fine Breasts” were entirely at odds with the new, chaster sensibility’ (Oxford DNB). To make matters worse, Wycherley’s Preface showered abuse on his critics, though it received appreciation from at least one contemporary reader, who has annototed the first page here: ‘A very fine (but somewhat too Prolix) Satyr upon resolved Criticks and Wou’d-be-Wits’, and marked several passages.

The final page optimistically concludes ‘The End of the First Volume’, but none further followed.

Hayward 138; Pforzheimer 1101, Foxon p. 907.

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