The Search for the Source of the Nile. With a preface by Quentin Keynes.

The Roxburghe Club, 1999.

£95

Approximately:
US $116€110

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The Search for the Source of the Nile. With a preface by Quentin Keynes.

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Correspondence between Captain Richard Burton, Captain John Speke and others, from Burton’s unpublished East African Letter Book; together with other related letters and papers in the collection of Quentin Keynes, now printed for the first time.  The letters selected for this collection, spanning the years 1854 to 1864, vividly present the unfolding drama of the search for the source of the Nile, one of the most dramatic and important events in nineteenth-century geography. Nineteen letters have been transcribed directly from Burton’s Letter Book, and the others were collected individually by Quentin Keynes from far-flung corners of the world.

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