AN EARLY APPEARANCE OF JOYCE’S WORK IN PROGRESS

Two Worlds – A Literary Quarterly Devoted to the Increase of the Gaiety of Nations.

New York: Sign of the Mockigrisball, 1925.

8vo., pp. 104; stiff printed wrappers, age-toned cover, chipped at corners, with loss to spine, otherwise a well-preserved copy of a fragile item.

£150

Approximately:
US $200€170

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First edition. Unnumbered, one of 500, of which 450 numbered copies were designated for subscribers. Between September 1925 and September 1926 Two Worlds published installments of Joyce’s ‘Work in Progress’ (Finnegan’s Wake), reprinted from European publications (in this case from Criterion, July 1925). The reprints were unauthorized by Joyce, and they ceased after five issues when no further fragments became available for reprinting.

The installments precede the publication of Finnegan’s Wake by fourteen years. Other contributors include Zukovsky, Villiers de L’Isle-Adam and Arthur Symons.

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