The Causidicade. A Panegyri-Satiri-Serio-Comic-Dramatical Poem. On the strange Resignation, and stranger-Promotion. .

London: Printed for M. Cooper … 1743

4to., pp. 29, [1], wanting the half-title, else a very good copy, disbound.

£125

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First edition, a verse satire on the sudden resignation as solicitor-general of Sir John Strange, one of the ‘old corps’ who still supported Walpole after his fall, and the appointment as his successor of William Murray, a member of the Duke of Newcastle’s circle. There is a satirical ‘Dramatis Personæ’ of Devouring Bears, Hungry Wolves, Cheating Foxes, Ravenous Vultures and the like. A contemporary hand identifies many of the disguised allusions. At first there was a rumour that Fielding was the author, which he indignantly denied (‘I never saw that infamous, paultry libel, till long after it had been in print’).

Foxon M 446.

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