The Strayed Reveller, and other Poems. By A.

London: B. Fellowes …1849

Small 8vo., pp. viii, 128; a very good copy in the original green fine-ribbed cloth, covers and spine stamped in blind, spine lettered in gilt.

£600

Approximately:
US $788€712

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Strayed Reveller, and other Poems. By A.

Checkout now

First edition of Arnold’s first book, apart from the Rugby and Oxford prize poems Alaric at Rome and Cromwell. To conceal his authorship as ‘A.’ suggests a certain reticence about the volume, even though it contains a number of his finest early poems, including ‘The Forsaken Merman’. Only 500 copies were printed, but while it may have sold badly, the traditional statement that the book was ‘withdrawn from circulation before many copies were sold’ (W. F. Prideaux) cannot be true as copies were still advertised for sale in Empedocles on Etna in 1852.

Hayward 256; Tinker 128.

You may also be interested in...

RAWLET, John.

Poetick Miscellanies …

First edition. Writing from the isolation of Newcastle, then a rural parish in fell country, Rawlet developed a mode of religious and descriptive poetry distinctly out of step with his own age, as is acknowledged by the editor in a verse preface: ‘Reader, expect not here, the filth of th’ Stage, / Poems that please, but more debauch the Age.’ Rawlet’s poems, such as ‘On a great Thunder and Storm’, ‘On a Cross with a Crown upon it, in Burton, betwixt Lancashire and Kendale’, and ‘On the sight of Furness Fells’, while looking back to Herbert in their weaving of the spiritual and the physical, please more by their anticipation of the topographical and sentimental concerns of the succeeding century.

Read more

[BYRON, George Gordon, Lord].

Lara, a Tale. [and] Jacqueline, a Tale [by Samuel Rogers].

First edition, Randolph’s fourth variant (with the crooked roman numeral on p. 82 and the fallen period on p. 20). By 1814 Byron was heavily pressed by debts, having previously refused payment for his poems. For Lara, the fourth of Byron’s Levantine poems, published on the back of The Corsair (‘The reader … may probably regard it as a sequel to a poem that recently appeared’), he accepted Murray’s offer of £700, thenceforth driving hard bargains for copyrights to his work. Jacqueline had previously been printed for private circulation; Lara appears here for the first time.

Read more