‘Shaw’s Advice to the Players of Major Barbara’, Reprinted from Theatre Survey, X, 1 (1969); and ‘Reflections on Shaw and Psychoanalysis’,

Reprinted from Modern Drama, XIV, 2 (1791).

Two works 8vo, stapled, both inscribed by the author, ‘with my compliments'.

£20

Approximately:
US $27€23

Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
‘Shaw’s Advice to the Players of Major Barbara’, Reprinted from Theatre Survey, X, 1 (1969); and ‘Reflections on Shaw and Psychoanalysis’,

Checkout now

You may also be interested in...

TRICK RIDING ASTLEY, Philip.

Astley’s System of equestrian Education, exhibiting the Beauties and Defects of the Horse, with serious and important Observations on his general Excellence, preserving him in Health, Grooming, &c.

Fifth edition of a work on horse-training by the ‘father of the modern circus’ (Chambers). Noted during military service in the Seven Years’ War not only for his daring in battle but also for his skills as a rider and breaker of horses, Philip Astley (1742-1814) established on his return to London a riding school on the south bank of the Thames opposite Westminster, where his displays of trick-riding, punctuated by comic interludes, drew much attention: ‘Styling himself the English Hussar, he promised such feats as straddling two cantering and jumping horses, doing headstands on a pint pot on the saddle … Mrs Astley would perform several of the turns … developing her own specialism in mounted apiculture’ (ODNB). His yard soon developed into an amphitheatre, and winter tours around Britain and Europe led to the establishment of theatres under his name in Dublin and Paris.

Read more

MORTON, Thomas.

Secrets worth knowing; a Comedy, in five Acts. As performed at the Theatre Royal, Covent Garden …

First edition of a comedy by the prolific dramatist Thomas Morton (first issue, with the epilogue beigging on F4 and four rather than five pages of ads). A prodigal son conceals his marriage to ensure his legacy, with unfortunate consueqences; it was ‘in some parts ludicrous and bordering on the improbable but on the whole affording an entertainment’ (European Magazine).

Read more