The Tragedies of Vittorio Alfieri; translated from the Italian … In three Volumes …

London: Printed for Longman, Hurst, Rees, Orme, and Brown … 1815.

3 vols., 12mo., lightly browned; a very good copy in later nineteenth century half plum morocco and marbled boards, gilt, joints and corners rubbed.

£450

Approximately:
US $628€528

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
The Tragedies of Vittorio Alfieri; translated from the Italian … In three Volumes …

Checkout now

First edition of this translation, which Lloyd undertook ‘on the suggestion of a friend whose judgement I highly respect’. This friend was likely Southey, who he addresses as his ‘sponsor’ in the ‘Dedicatory Sonnet’. He held Southey in high esteem, and benefited from his friendship through testing times. Lloyd’s temperament was always difficult, but in 1811 he began to suffer serious auditory delusions, which clouded the rest of his life in periodic spells of insanity. De Quincey suggests that he began the Alfieri project to divert his mind from the onset of madness, and held that Lloyd was amongst the most interesting men he had known.

Lloyd explains his aim to ‘catch perspicuously the general meaning of Alfieri, without at all binding myself down for a literal word-for-word translation, or to a close imitation of his style’. This is indeed a work of some poetic licence, although he maintains the original’s eight dedications to various nobles, including Charles I ‘an unfortunate and dead king’, and General Washington ‘the most illustrious and free citizen’. These, especially the final dedication to ‘The future People of Italy’, convey Alfieri’s hopes for the rousing lessons of antiquity.

You may also be interested in...

[FAUVEAU, Felicie de.]

Il monumento dell’ illustre ed egregia scultrice madamigella Felicita de Fauveau illustrato dal P.B. socio corrispondende di varie accademie e deciato alla nobile di lei genitrice la signra Ippolita de Fauveau.

Very rare commemoration, published anonymously, of the sepulchral monument made by the Franco-Italian sculpter Félicie de Fauveau for her mother, found in the cloister of Santa Maria del Carmine in Florence. De Fauveau (1801–1886), called ‘the new Canova’ by Stendhall after her participation in the Paris Salon in 1827, had lived in Florence since 1834, having exiled herself from France after the Revolution of 1830. There she became widely sought after as a sculptor, and was commissioned by the likes of Nicolas I of Russia; her works include a font at the Palazzo Pitti and funerary monuments in Santa Croce and the English Cemetery in Piazzale Donatello. The monument to her mother, created in 1859, is perhaps her best known work; the author here places it in the context of Florentine art, describing the whole as ‘mirabile e istraordinario’.

Read more

GARGIULO, Raffaele.

Cenni sulla maniera di rinvenire i vasi fittili Italo-Greci. Sulla loro costruzione, sulle loro fabbriche più distinte e sulla progressione e decadimento dell’arte vasaria ... seconda edizione riveduta e corretta con l’aggiunta di nuove osservazioni.

Second, revised and enlarged edition (first 1831), illustrated with sixteen handsome engraved plates.

Read more