Tsar Golod. Predstavlenie v piati kartinakh s prologom [King Hunger. A play in five scenes with a prologue].

[St Petersburg,] ‘Shipovnik’, 1908.

8vo, pp. 127, with folding engraved frontispiece and 7 illustrations in text by E. Lansere, + 8ll. advertisements; a very good copy, uncut in the original illustrated wrappers by Lansere, spine chipped at head and tail and sometime repaired; in a folding cloth box.

£800

Approximately:
US $1106€926

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Tsar Golod. Predstavlenie v piati kartinakh s prologom [King Hunger. A play in five scenes with a prologue].

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First edition of this play by one of the most popular writers in Russia during the first decade of the 20th century: Andreev’s fame ‘was almost on a par with that of Chekhov and Gorky. The fact remains that his talent and topical themes, his literary techniques combining tradition and modernism, the boldness of his imagination, and a captivating sketchiness of thought in dealing with complex moral-psychological and philosophical problems, endeared him to a significant segment of the intelligentsia and made him consonant with the times. And though the readership and that epoch are gone forever, some of Andreev’s characteristics, particularly his obvious talent, ensure for him a permanent place in Russian literature’ (Victor Terras).

Kilgour 33.

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