De vicariis basilicarum urbis tractatus Canonico-Theologicus.

Rome, typis Antonii de Rubeis in via Seminarii Romani prope Rotundam, 1744.

4to, pp. 54, [2]; roman and italic letter; large woodcut ornament to title page, animated woodcut initials, woodcut headpieces; a little light foxing, paper lightly toned throughout, two short worm trails to title far from text, minute marginal wormhole in first two quires; a good copy in contemporary stiff vellum, title lettered to spine, cover slightly wormed with small loss at head of spine; edges sprinkled red.

£450

Approximately:
US $589€512

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First edition, rare, of Andreucci’s treatise of the juridical and hierarchical prerogatives of the prelates of the basilicae. It was to be reprinted twenty years later as part of the author’s work on ecclesiastical hierarchies.

Two copies found in American libraries: at Columbia and at the Catholic University.


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