The Gentleman’s compleat Jockey, with the perfect Horse-Man and experienc’d Farrier, containing: I. the Nature of Horses, their Breeding, Feeding, and Management in all Paces, to fit them for War, Racing, Travel, Hunting, or other Recreations and Advantages; II. the true Method, with proper Rules and Directions, to order, diet, and physic the Running-Horse, to bring him to any Match, or Race, with Success; III. the Methods to buy Horses, and prevent being cheated, noting the particular Marks of the good and bad Horses, in all their Circumstances; IV. how to make Blazes, Stars, and Snips, to fatten a Horse with little Charge, and to make him lively and lovely; V. the whole Art of a Farrier, in Curing all Diseases, Griefs, and Sorrances incident to Horses, with their Symptoms and Causes; VI. the Methods of Shooing, Blooding, Rowling, Purging, and Prevention of Diseases, and many other Things from long Experience and approved Practice; by A.S., Gent.

London, Peter Parker, 1711.

12mo, pp. [4], 164, [12]; without the frontispiece; edges chipped and in places torn, occasionally touching text, a few instances of foxing; early twentieth-century brown cloth, spine ruled and lettered directly in gilt; lightly rubbed and bumped.

£1750

Approximately:
US $2122€2027

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The Gentleman’s compleat Jockey, with the perfect Horse-Man and experienc’d Farrier, containing: I. the Nature of Horses, their Breeding, Feeding, and Management in all Paces, to fit them for War, Racing, Travel, Hunting, or other Recreations and Advantages; II. the true Method, with proper Rules and Directions, to order, diet, and physic the Running-Horse, to bring him to any Match, or Race, with Success; III. the Methods to buy Horses, and prevent being cheated, noting the particular Marks of the good and bad Horses, in all their Circumstances; IV. how to make Blazes, Stars, and Snips, to fatten a Horse with little Charge, and to make him lively and lovely; V. the whole Art of a Farrier, in Curing all Diseases, Griefs, and Sorrances incident to Horses, with their Symptoms and Causes; VI. the Methods of Shooing, Blooding, Rowling, Purging, and Prevention of Diseases, and many other Things from long Experience and approved Practice; by A.S., Gent.

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Fifth edition, very scarce, of an anonymous early farriery manual. Among the first popular guides to farriery, a form which would be much copied throughout the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, the Gentleman’s compleat Jockey (formerly attributed to Adolphus Speed) was first published in 1696 and soon underwent several editions, each of which survives in limited numbers only. Of this edition OCLC records three copies worldwide (Keeneland, Texas, Berlin).

ESTC N483162; cf. Dejager 155 (first edition); cf. Dingley 1 & 2 (first and sixth editions); not in Mellon.

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