The Chace, the Turf, and the Road … second Edition.

London, Vizetelly Brothers & Co. for John Murray, 1843.

8vo, pp. [6], xi, [1 (blank)], 258, viii (advertisements); engraved title, 3 engraved part-titles, 11 plates, and woodcut vignettes in text; lightly toned; publisher’s pink pictorial cloth, blocked in blind and gilt, yellow endpapers; dust-stained and a little sunned, lightly bumped at extremities, split to lower hinge; bookplate removed from upper pastedown.

£125

Approximately:
US $151€144

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Second edition, in the publisher’s gilt cloth, illustrated by Henry Alken. A sporting writer who ‘may even be said to have created the role of gentleman hunting correspondent’ (ODNB), Charles James Apperley (1778–1843) published widely on hunting and horsemanship, from 1822 under the pseudonym ‘Nimrod’. In the course of his work he travelled widely to partake in hunts, reportedly driving the coaches on which he was a passenger and riding his own horses in race meetings. When his generous salary from the Sporting Magazine was stopped in 1828, however, his fame did not support him and he fled to Calais to avoid debt in 1831, remaining there for the next decade.

The Chace, the Turf, and the Road is a collection of articles by Apperley which had appeared in the Quarterly Review, first published together in 1837.

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