THE PORT ROYAL LOGIC

La logique ou l’art de penser, contenant, outre les regles communes, plusieurs observations nouvelles propres à former le iugement.

Paris, Jean Guignart, Charles Savreaux, Jean de Launay, 1662.

12mo, pp. 473, [7, table of contents, errata, privilege]; light toning, light damp staining to upper outer corners at beginning, small burn hole to pp. 429-434 repaired and lost words supplied in manuscript; otherwise a very good copy in contemporary calf, spine gilt in compartments, sprinkled edges; joints and extremities a little worn; inscription ‘Emile Calais 1852’ to rear endpaper.

£2500

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US $3102€2812

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Scarce first edition of the work known as the Port Royal Logic. The authors were leaders of the Port Royal movement, and the book displays the distinctive tone of earnest piety for which the movement became famous. La Logique was the most famous logic text of the seventeenth century and set the form of manuals of logic for the next two hundred years. In particular, its division of the subject into the theory of conception, of judgment, of reasoning and of method established a psychologistic approach which dominated the field until the time of Frege. A handbook on method rather than a study of formal logic in the strict sense, La Logique was strongly and consciously Cartesian: a development from Descartes’ Regulae rather than Aristotle’s Prior Analytics. It nevertheless made important technical advances, most notably its distinction between the comprehension and extension of a term (a development of the medieval distinction between significatio and suppositio and a forerunner of Hamilton’s distinction between intension and extension); its quasi-mathematical treatment of the rules of distribution, conversion and syllogistic; and its formulation of the deduction theorem.

BM STC French 1601-1700, p. 333; Risse I, p.153.

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LECTIONARY,

in French and Latin, with readings from the Gospel of John, the Book of Wisdom, and Ephesians; a partial bifolium (leaves not consecutive), double columns of 30 lines written in a good formal gothic bookhand in brown ink, ruled lightly with ink, five two-line initials delicately painted in pink or blue against burnished gold grounds and with ivyleaf extensions, ten one-line initials in burnished gold against pink and blue grounds, capitals touched in yellow, Latin passages underlined in red, original numbering in red at head of each leaf ‘xii. xix.’ and ‘xiii. iiii.’, rubrics; trimmed at foot, without loss of text, and at fore-margins, occasionally affecting a letter or two, but in excellent condition. 202 x 141 mm (172 x 120 mm)

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[LE MERCIER DE LA RIVIÈRE, Pierre Paul].

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