Collected poems. Edited by Edward Mendelson.

London, Faber and Faber, 1976.

Large 8vo, pp. 696; a very good copy in publisher’s green cloth, gilt-lettered spine, green dust-jacket lettered in white; slight wear to extremities, dust-jacket chipped and worn; from the library of Denis Healey.

£125

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US $155€140

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Collected poems. Edited by Edward Mendelson.

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First edition. Denis Healey’s copy, with his signature dated 1976 to front free endpaper, his occasional marginal pencil marks, and a few notes to rear pastedown. Denis Winston Healey, Baron Healey (1917-2015) served as Secretary of State for Defence from 1964 to 1970, Chancellor of the Exchequer from 1974 to 1979 and Deputy Leader of the Labour Party from 1980 to 1983.

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