Aristippus, or, Monsieur de Balsac’s Masterpiece, being a Discourse concerning the Court … Englished by R.W.

London: Printed by Tho. Newcomb for Nat. Eakins … and Tho. Johnson … 1659.

12mo., pp. [16], 159, [17]; a very good copy in eighteenth-century calf, rubbed, spine label wanting; clear-cut armorial bookplate to front pastedown of Edward Blount of Blagdon (d. 1726).

£750

Approximately:
US $989€839

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First edition in English of Aristippe (1657), a treatise on wisdom in political administration dedicated to Queen Christina of Sweden, who was an admirer. Balzac was particularly reputed for the quality of his prose, seen as raising it to the same perfection as Malherbe did for French verse. At the end is an apposite extract from an earlier work, The elegant Combat (1634), comprising his conversations with Pierre du Moulin. Wing B 612.

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