A Letter in Praise of Verona [1489]. In the original Latin Text with an English Translation by Betty Radice.

Verona, [Officina Bodoni,] 1974.

Tall 8vo., pp. 55, [3]; printed in blue, yellow, red and black on hand-made paper; a fine copy, in the original quarter vellum, blue Roma paper sides, spine and top edge gilt; blue slipcase, slightly faded.

£375

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A Letter in Praise of Verona [1489]. In the original Latin Text with an English Translation by Betty Radice.

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First edition, No. 34 of 150 copies: an elegant facsimile reprint of one of Verona’s rarest incunables. Barduzzi’s eulogistic letter to Giovanni Nesi was first printed in 1489 by Paulus Fridenperger. The Latin text is followed here by an English translation and a biographical postscript by Giovanni Mardersteig, head of the Officina Bodoni. The colour ornaments are reproduced from those of Felice Feliciano, one of the most important calligraphers of his day, taken from his manuscripts of the 1460s. Mardersteig and Schmoller 190.

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