The Library of Thomas Tresham and Thomas Brudenell. With an introduction by John Martin Robinson.

The Roxburghe Club, 2006.

£95

Approximately:
US $115€106

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The Library of Thomas Tresham and Thomas Brudenell. With an introduction by John Martin Robinson.

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Sir Thomas Tresham (1543–1605) remains best-known for his buildings, especially the market house at Rothwell, the Triangular Lodge at Rushton and Lyveden New Bield. His library, one of the largest in England of its time, has hitherto attracted comparatively little interest. Now, as a result of a careful examination of both the portion of the library which has been preserved at Deene Park in Northamptonshire by the descendants of Tresham’s son-in-law, Thomas Brudenell, and of a manuscript inventory of the original library, Nicolas Barker and David Quentin have provided a detailed picture of the library and the circumstances of its creation.  The catalogue of nearly 2,000 works shows that Tresham owned the latest works on architecture, mathematics, astronomy and science, Catholic theology and devotion, with a wide range of works on history and literature. John Martin Robinson’s introduction gives much information on Tresham’s family and his patronage of architecture.

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