The Wizard Earl’s Advices to his Son. A Facsimile and Transcript from the Manuscript of Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland, at Petworth House.

The Roxburghe Club, 2002.

£300

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The Wizard Earl’s Advices to his Son. A Facsimile and Transcript from the Manuscript of Henry Percy, 9th Earl of Northumberland, at Petworth House.

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The ‘Wizard Earl’, Henry, Ninth Earl of Northumberland, spent much of his life under suspicion. He was, first of all, suspected of being a member of the ‘School of Night’, the butt of Shakespeare’s Love’s Labours Lost. Secondly, and more gravely, he was suspected of involvement in the Gunpowder Plot and imprisoned in the Tower for almost sixteen years. It was during his incarceration that he compiled advice to his son and heir, Algernon. This work is a full facsimile, with a diplomatic transcript, of the ‘Advices to his Son’. The texts are prefaced with an extended introduction by Professor G. R. Batho and Dr Stephen Clucas, who together provide a full and up-to-date account of the Earl’s life, the writing of the ‘Advices’, and his intellectual tastes and development.

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