CHARTERHOUSE SCHOOL

An historical Account of Thomas Sutton Esq; and of his Foundation in Charter-House …

London: Printed by E. Owen, and sold by F. Gyles … W. Hinchliffe … J. and P. Knapton … J. Stagg … and S. Birt … 1737.

8vo., pp. xvi, 275, [1], with engraved portrait frontispiece, folding view of Charterhouse, and a folding engraving of Sutton’s tomb; occasional light foxing, else a very good, crisp copy in contemporary sprinkled calf, rebacked.

£250

Approximately:
US $320€284

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
An historical Account of Thomas Sutton Esq; and of his Foundation in Charter-House …

Checkout now

First edition. Thomas Sutton (1532-1611) was an Elizabethan civil servant who made an enormous fortune from leases of land rich in coal in Durham. In 1611 he bought Howard House for £13,000 from the Earl of Suffolk; the building acquired its more familiar name, ‘Charterhouse’, after the order of monks who inhabited the original institution, a Carthusian monastery. Sutton quickly set about establishing a free school for forty boys and a hospital for poverty-stricken gentlemen. By the time of his death, he had organised a Master and a group of governors for the foundation, to which he bequeathed the majority of his fortune. Charterhouse finally opened its doors in 1614. The school moved to its present site in Godalming in 1872.

The annual founder’s day ceremonies at Charterhouse included a ‘Latin Oration in the Hall by one of the Scholars, in Praise of this our most munificent Benefactor’. Here a former pupil has written, ‘Spoken by me Bernard Port in the year of our Lord 1793’ (p. 161).

You may also be interested in...

COLERIDGE, S[amuel] T[aylor].

The Statesman’s Manual; or the Bible the best guide to political Skill and Foresight: a Lay Sermon, addressed to the higher Class of Society, with an Appendix, containing Comments and Essays connected with the Study of the inspired Writings …

First edition of the first of Coleridge’s ‘Lay Sermons’, written in Highgate at the house of James Gillman, to whom Coleridge had come as an in-patient for his opium addiction.

Read more

THE SIEGE OF ’S-HERTOGENBOSCH‘WORTHY OF READING’ JORNALL.

A Jornall of certaine principall Passages in and before the Towne of S’hertogenbosh, from the 18 of August till the 1. of September, at what time they fell to Capitulation concerning the Rendition of the Towne. Whereunto is added, a Sermon made by the Bishop of S’hertogenbosh in S. Johns Church, (before the Towne was rendered), to appease the Burgers and Inhabitants, which were in an Uprore. [Followed by:]
Articles agreed upon and concluded betweene the victorious, excellent, high and mighty Prince and Lord, Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, Count of Nassaw, &c. on the one part, and the vanquished Towne of S’hertogenbosh on the other Side ... worthy of Reading.

First edition. The fortified Catholic town of ’s-Hertogenbosch (‘the Duke’s forest’) in Brabant in the southern Netherlands had endured as a Habsburg stronghold since the middle of the sixteenth century despite attempts by successive Princes of Orange to bring it under the rule of the Protestant United Provinces. The fortress, protected by the rivers Dommel and Aa, had long been considered unassailable, until in 1629, in the Thirty Years War, it was finally conquered by Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, by building dykes on the rivers and draining the marshes so that assault by land was possible. A Jornall reports the siege to the end of August, Articles prints the terms of surrender reached on 4 September.

Read more