CHARTERHOUSE SCHOOL

An historical Account of Thomas Sutton Esq; and of his Foundation in Charter-House …

London: Printed by E. Owen, and sold by F. Gyles … W. Hinchliffe … J. and P. Knapton … J. Stagg … and S. Birt … 1737.

8vo., pp. xvi, 275, [1], with engraved portrait frontispiece, folding view of Charterhouse, and a folding engraving of Sutton’s tomb; occasional light foxing, else a very good, crisp copy in contemporary sprinkled calf, rebacked.

£250

Approximately:
US $349€283

Make an enquiry

First edition. Thomas Sutton (1532-1611) was an Elizabethan civil servant who made an enormous fortune from leases of land rich in coal in Durham. In 1611 he bought Howard House for £13,000 from the Earl of Suffolk; the building acquired its more familiar name, ‘Charterhouse’, after the order of monks who inhabited the original institution, a Carthusian monastery. Sutton quickly set about establishing a free school for forty boys and a hospital for poverty-stricken gentlemen. By the time of his death, he had organised a Master and a group of governors for the foundation, to which he bequeathed the majority of his fortune. Charterhouse finally opened its doors in 1614. The school moved to its present site in Godalming in 1872.

The annual founder’s day ceremonies at Charterhouse included a ‘Latin Oration in the Hall by one of the Scholars, in Praise of this our most munificent Benefactor’. Here a former pupil has written, ‘Spoken by me Bernard Port in the year of our Lord 1793’ (p. 161).

You may also be interested in...

BARDUZZI, Bernardino.

A Letter in Praise of Verona [1489]. In the original Latin Text with an English Translation by Betty Radice.

First edition, No. 34 of 150 copies: an elegant facsimile reprint of one of Verona’s rarest incunables. Barduzzi’s eulogistic letter to Giovanni Nesi was first printed in 1489 by Paulus Fridenperger. The Latin text is followed here by an English translation and a biographical postscript by Giovanni Mardersteig, head of the Officina Bodoni. The colour ornaments are reproduced from those of Felice Feliciano, one of the most important calligraphers of his day, taken from his manuscripts of the 1460s. Mardersteig and Schmoller 190.

Read more

PROMOTING AGRICULTURE IN THE COLONIES SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF ARTS, MANUFACTURES, AND COMMERCE.

Premiums by the Society, established at London, for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures, and Commerce.

First edition of the 1759 list of premiums. The Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce, now known as the Royal Society of Arts, was founded in 1754 by William Shipley, a drawing master living in Northampton, to awarded ‘premiums’ (cash prizes) to support improvements in the liberal arts and sciences. A key stipulation was that these should be freely available to all and not protected by patent. The Society held its first meeting in Rawthmell’s Coffee House, Covent Garden in1755, and later that year awarded its first premiums, and from 1756 also awarded medals.

Read more