Kak my pishem [How we write].

Leningrad, Izdatel’stvo pisatelei, [1930].

Small 8vo, pp. 216, [8]; a very good copy in the original quarter cloth, paper boards designed by M. Kirnarsky.

£450

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Kak my pishem [How we write].

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First edition: sketches on the art of writing, published as an aid to young writers, with contributions from Bely, Gorky, Zamyatin, Zoshchenko, Kaverin, Lavrenev, Libedinsky, Nikitin, Pilnyak, Slonimsky, Tikhonov, Aleksei Tolstoy, Tynyanov, Fedin, Olga Forsh, Chapygin, Shishkov, and Shklovsky.

Hellyer 164.

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