History of Photography in China 1842-1860.

[London], Bernard Quaritch Ltd, 2009.

Small 4to., (248 x 238mm), pp. xiv, 242, with over 150 illustrations; cloth-bound with pictorial dust-jacket.

£50

Approximately:
US $60€57

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History of Photography in China 1842-1860.

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The first comprehensive history of the earliest years of photography in China, combining previously unpublished research with over 150 photographs, many of which are attributed and published here for the first time.

The images are drawn from institutional and private collections from all over the world, and the text includes extensive documentary notes, valuable listings of early stereoviews and biographies of more than forty photographers working in China up to 1860. It also introduces important new detail on the life of Felix Beato.

ISBN: 978-0-9563012-0-8.

View the index to this three-part series here: https://goo.gl/fNX2kz. The 2nd volume (Western Photographers in China 1861–1879) is introduced here: https://goo.gl/1vdmDS and the 3rd volume (Chinese Photographers 1844–1879) here: https://goo.gl/xdgc36.

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