History of Photography in China: Western Photographers 1861-1879.

London, Quaritch, 2010.

Small 4to., (230 x 238 mm), pp. xii, 420, over 400 illustrations; cloth-bound with pictorial dust jacket.

£70

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US $91€79

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The second volume in our series on the history of photography in China, this is the most extensive general survey of Western photographers working in China in the 1860s and 1870s. Over eighty different photographers are discussed – from well-known professionals to little-known amateurs – with previously unpublished biographical information. The book also includes documentary appendices of the photographers’ published works, a bibliography, chronologies and a biographical index.

ISBN: 978-0-9563012-1-5.

View the index to this three-part series here. The 1st volume (History of Photography in China 1842-1860) is introduced here and the 3rd volume (Chinese Photographers 1844–1879) here.

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