History of Photography in China: Western Photographers 1861-1879.

London, Quaritch, 2010.

Small 4to., (230 x 238 mm), pp. xii, 420, over 400 illustrations; cloth-bound with pictorial dust jacket.

£70

Approximately:
US $88€78

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
History of Photography in China: Western Photographers 1861-1879.

Checkout now

The second volume in our series on the history of photography in China, this is the most extensive general survey of Western photographers working in China in the 1860s and 1870s. Over eighty different photographers are discussed – from well-known professionals to little-known amateurs – with previously unpublished biographical information. The book also includes documentary appendices of the photographers’ published works, a bibliography, chronologies and a biographical index.

ISBN: 978-0-9563012-1-5.

View the index to this three-part series here. The 1st volume (History of Photography in China 1842-1860) is introduced here and the 3rd volume (Chinese Photographers 1844–1879) here.

You may also be interested in...

GALLOP, Annabel.

Malay seals from the Islamic world of Southeast Asia.

A new publication by Annabel Teh Gallop, Lead Curator in Southeast Asia Collections at the British Library, published by NUS Press in Singapore. The British Library website describes Malay seals as ‘a catalogue of 2,168 seals sourced from more than 70 public institutions and 60 private collections worldwide. The seals are primarily recorded from impressions stamped in lampblack, ink or wax on manuscript letters, treaties and other documents, but around 300 seal matrices made of silver, brass or stone are also documented. These Malay seals originate from the present-day territories of Malaysia, Brunei, Singapore, Indonesia and the southern parts of Thailand, Cambodia and the Philippines, and date from the second half of the 16th century to the early twentieth century.’

Read more

C[OLOMBO]. A[POTHECARIES]. CO. LTD.

Caryota Urens (Kitul), Botanical Study,

Charles Scowen arrived in Ceylon around 1873 and was initially an assistant to R. Edley, the Commission Agent in Kandy before opening a photographic studio around 1876. By 1885 his photography firm had studios in Colombo and Kandy. Scowen was a later arrival to Ceylon than Skeen and his work is less well-known, but: ‘Much of Scowen’s surviving work displays an artistic sensibility and technical mastery which is often superior to their longer-established competitor. In particular, the botanical studies are outstanding…’ (Falconer, J. and Raheem, I., Regeneration: a reappraisal of photography in Ceylon 1850 –1900, p. 19). In the early 1890s the firm was being run by Mortimer Scowen, a relative of Charles Scowen. By about 1894 the firm’s stock of negatives had been acquired by the ‘Colombo Apothecaries Co Ltd’. This print is likely to have been made in the 1890s from negatives made earlier.

Read more