NUMISMATIC IN THE EARLY 1800S

Autograph letter to the bookseller Lackington.

Upper Gower Street [London], 25 August 1819.

8vo, pp. 1 + 1 blank, slightly trimmed at upper right-hand corner, light foxing, creases where folded.

£100

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Autograph letter to the bookseller Lackington.

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Writing in the third person, Bentham requests that he be sent the ‘Supplemt of Mr Ruding’s Coins intended for the purchasers of the quarto edn’. Rogers Ruding (1751-1820) published his Annals of the Coinage, a chronological account of English coinage, in four quarto volumes in 1817. It sold out quickly and was republished in 1819.

William Bentham, barrister, lived at 98 Upper Gower Street, between 1789 and 1836. He was probably a descendant of Bishop Thomas Bentham (1513/14-1579) and therefore a cousin of the philosopher Jeremy Bentham. The following note appeared in the Proceedings of the Royal Numismatic Society upon his death in 1836: ‘In Mr Bentham, numismatic science has lost an ardent promoter and extensive collector, as the catalogue of his collection, now in the Society’s library, evinces.’

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