The First Part of the Justice of the Peace his Companion; or, a Summary of all the Acts of Parliament, whereby one, two, or more Justices of the Peace, are authorized to act, not only in, but out of the Sessions of Peace. Begun by Samuel Blackerby … Alphabetically digested, and continued to the End of the last Session of Parliament, 1734. With an Exact Table, by Nathaniel Blackerby …

London, E. & R. Nutt and R. Gosling for J. Walhoe, 1734.

Two vols, 12mo, pp. [xxiv], 540; [4], vii–xxiv, 360 (irregularly paginated but complete), with publisher’s advertisement leaf before the title; a fine, bright copy of the First Part, with very occasional ink markings; contemporary ownership inscription on the front free endpaper and some browning, soiling, and waterstaining in the Second; both vols in near-contemporary non-uniform calf, worn, front joint cracked to Second Part, cords firm.

£450

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US $615€525

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The First Part of the Justice of the Peace his Companion; or, a Summary of all the Acts of Parliament, whereby one, two, or more Justices of the Peace, are authorized to act, not only in, but out of the Sessions of Peace. Begun by Samuel Blackerby … Alphabetically digested, and continued to the End of the last Session of Parliament, 1734. With an Exact Table, by Nathaniel Blackerby …

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Later editions of this important source of information on crime and the work of the magistracy in early seventeenth-century England. Samuel Blackerby’s Justice of the Peace his Companion … was first published by Walhoe in 1711, and appeared under the title Cases in Law wherein Justices of Peace have a jurisdiction … in 1717. We offer the second edition of Nathaniel Blackerby’s revised and updated versions; the first was published in 1729 (Second Part) and 1730 (First Part).

Marvin, p. 128; Sweet and Maxwell II, 55 (5).

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