Lara, a Tale. [and] Jacqueline, a Tale [by Samuel Rogers].

London: Printed for John Murray … 1814.

8vo., pp. [8], 128, [4], with the half-title and two final advertisement leaves; a very good copy, uncut in the original drab boards, paper spine label, front hinge cracked, spine a little worn and chipped at foot.

£400

Approximately:
US $518€462

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Lara, a Tale. [and] Jacqueline, a Tale [by Samuel Rogers].

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First edition, Randolph’s fourth variant (with the crooked roman numeral on p. 82 and the fallen period on p. 20). By 1814 Byron was heavily pressed by debts, having previously refused payment for his poems. For Lara, the fourth of Byron’s Levantine poems, published on the back of The Corsair (‘The reader … may probably regard it as a sequel to a poem that recently appeared’), he accepted Murray’s offer of £700, thenceforth driving hard bargains for copyrights to his work. Jacqueline had previously been printed for private circulation; Lara appears here for the first time.

Randolph, pp. 42-4.

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