Lara, a Tale. [and] Jacqueline, a Tale [by Samuel Rogers].

London: Printed for John Murray … 1814.

8vo., pp. [8], 128, [4], with the half-title and two final advertisement leaves; a very good copy, uncut in the original drab boards, paper spine label, front hinge cracked, spine a little worn and chipped at foot.

£400

Approximately:
US $497€443

Add to basket Make an enquiry

Added to your basket:
Lara, a Tale. [and] Jacqueline, a Tale [by Samuel Rogers].

Checkout now

First edition, Randolph’s fourth variant (with the crooked roman numeral on p. 82 and the fallen period on p. 20). By 1814 Byron was heavily pressed by debts, having previously refused payment for his poems. For Lara, the fourth of Byron’s Levantine poems, published on the back of The Corsair (‘The reader … may probably regard it as a sequel to a poem that recently appeared’), he accepted Murray’s offer of £700, thenceforth driving hard bargains for copyrights to his work. Jacqueline had previously been printed for private circulation; Lara appears here for the first time.

Randolph, pp. 42-4.

You may also be interested in...

[BROWN or BROWNE, Nicholas].

The North-Country-Wedding, and the Fire, two Poems in blank Verse …

First and only edition, rare, of the only published work by the Fermanagh-born poet and clergyman Nicholas Brown (1699-1734), misattributed by ESTC to his father. Both pieces are burlesques in the manner of Philips’s The Splendid Shilling, but have their own merit, and were reprinted by Matthew Concanen in his Miscellaneous Poems … by several Hands (1724).

Read more

THE NEWARK PIRATE’S SURREPTITIOUS REPRINT BYRON, George Gordon, Lord.

Poems original and translated … Second Edition.

Unacknowledged reprint of the ‘second’ [i.e. first] edition of Poems original and translated, printed by Ridge without Byron’s permission. As the first printing ran out Ridge told Byron that he had reprinted some sheets to make up a few more copies; in fact he was to continue to reprint the whole volume surreptitiously on paper watermarked 1811. John Murray later noticed either this imposture or the spurious ‘large paper’ copies of Hours of Idleness, and informed Byron who replied, ‘I have no means of ascertaining whether the Newark Pirate has been doing what you say – if so – he is a rascal & a shabby rascal too – and if his offence is punishable by law or pugilism he shall be fined or buffeted’ (5 February 1814).

Read more