The Felicity of God’s Children, considered in a Sermon, preached upon the Death of a Lady, in the parish Church of St. Giles, Reading, on Sunday Morning, November 20, 1796 ....

Reading: Printed and Sold by Smart and Cowslade; and sold by J. Rusher, Reading; Messrs. Robinsons, V. Griffiths ... & J. Matthews ... London; and Lewis and Fienes, Chelsea. 1796.

8vo., pp. [2], ii, 24, [2, blank], wanting the half-title else a very good copy, stitched as issued, uncut.

£75

Approximately:
US $91€82

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The Felicity of God’s Children, considered in a Sermon, preached upon the Death of a Lady, in the parish Church of St. Giles, Reading, on Sunday Morning, November 20, 1796 ....

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First edition, a funeral sermon by the popular preacher William Bromley Cadogan, a friend of John Newton, for the local widow Maria Littlehales, printed at the request of her children. A younger son of the third Earl of Cadogan, the well-connected churchman was vicar of St. Giles, Reading, and rector of Chelsea (which was in his father’s gift). Although his principles were High Church he preached with an evangelical fervour that led Wesley to send him copies of his works, which he burned in his kitchen, vowing that he would learn the truth from Scripture alone. He died two months after preaching this sermon.

ESTC shows four copies: BL, Durham, Bodley, and Rylands.

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