ON WOMEN, METHODISTS AND BASTARDS

Literary Recreations …

London: Printed by W. Wilson … for Longman, Hurst, Rees, and Orme … 1809.

8vo, pp. [4], 299, [1 (blank)], [4 (advertisements)]; some occasional spotting, offset from a spool of thread (no longer present) to pp. 236-7, else a very good copy in early maroon roan, covers tooled in blind and gilt, spine gilt in compartments; ownership inscription to title-page of Robert Courtenay.

£650

Approximately:
US $724€739

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Literary Recreations …

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First edition of a scarce collection of miscellaneous essays on such topics as ‘the Condition and Character of Women in different Countries and Ages’ (pp. 51-118), the ‘Rapid Growth of Methodism’ (pp. 131-187), and ‘Bastards’ (pp. 199-227).

Card (1779–1844), then resident in Margate, had previously published a History of the Revolutions of Russia and works on the Papacy and education; evidently one to try his hand in all fields, he later wrote a novel, Beauford (1811), and a play, The Brother in Law (1817).

Library Hub (Copac) shows copies at the BL, Society of Antiquaries, and Manchester only.

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